23/04/2013

chinjugami - tutelary deity

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chinjugami 鎮守神 tutelary deities

chinju 鎮守 regional deity, local deity


source : wakui/diary

chinju doo 鎮守堂 Hall for the Regional Kami, a kind of Hokora, tochidoo 土地堂


quote
Chinjugami
A kami acting as a tutelary of a circumscribed geographical region or area of land.
Believed to have originated with the qié-lán-shen (Jp. garanjin 伽藍神), tutelary deities of temple compounds in China, the growth of kami-buddha syncretism (shinbutsu shūgō) led to the dedication (kanjō) of various kami within the precincts of temples in Japan as well.

Famous examples of such temple tutelaries include
Niu Myōjin at Kongōbuji (Mt. Kōya),
Sannō Gongen
at Enryakuji (Kyoto), and
Kasuga Myōjin at Kōfukuji (Nara).


Based on this practice, kami were later dedicated as tutelaries of the nation and palace, followed by tutelaries of provinces and castles, and even noble manors (shōen) and domains. Some of the guardian kami thus dedicated included the Ise and Kamo shrines as tutelaries of the nation and capital, and the Ichi no miya shrines as provincial tutelaries. As tutelaries of shōen estates, various kami of the capital region were selected for their deep ties to the noble proprietors of such estates, while the Sannō Shrine (present-day Hie Jinja) was dedicated by Tokugawa Ieyasu as a tutelary of the shogun's castle in Edo.

In other cases, kami were dedicated as the protectors of the homes of individual families. These tutelaries were originally selected for their characteristics as powerful kami with the ability to subdue local indigenous land spirits, and make them subject to the new resident, with the end of providing safety to the region and its occupants. With time, however, such dedicated outside tutelaries became confused with the indigenous local land spirits themselves, so that from the medieval and particularly in the early modern period, a wide variety of shrines with differing lineages and histories came to be broadly known as village chinjugami.

In some cases, shrines originally dedicated by local gentry families rose to the status of clan kami (ujigami), and thence came to be celebrated as chinjugami of all people living within the geographical village; in others, the development of new land would be accompanied by the dedication of a shrine as the ubusunagami 産土神 (residents' tutelary) for the occupants of the new land, and that kami would subsequently come to be called the chinjugami of the newly developed geographical area.

Such trends were furthered by the government's system of temple registration (terauke) during the early modern period; under this system, shrines were placed under the management of Buddhist temples, with the result that many shrines came to be viewed as the chinju of the associated temple. Through this process, chinjugami came to be viewed as little different from ujigami and ubusunagami, and the chinjugami came to be worshiped as a divine tutelary of all the people living within its realm. This is the significance of the term chinju no mori ("grove of the chinju") which is used to describe the groves of trees at modern Shinto shrines.
source : Suzuki Kentarō, Kokugakuin 2005



. ujigami 氏神 tutelary deity, guardian/patron deity, clan deity .


. WKD : place where I was born, ubusuna 産土 .
The place where a baby is born and gets its first clothes (ubugi). There the local gods live (ubusunagami 産土神), who protect the baby. In haiku, it can therefore carry a lot of meaning.

Visit to a temple of the God of one's birthplace (ubusunagami  産土神)
..... ubusuna mairi 産土神参 うぶすなまいり
kigo for the New Year

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chinju no mori 鎮守の森 forest in the shrine compound



This group tries to bring people together in the local shrine to practise exercises for health, breathe the fresh air and relax to improve wellbeing.
鎮守の森コミュニティ研究所 Chinju-no-Mori (Grove of the Village Shrine) Community Research Institute)
- source : c-chinju.org


CHINJU-NO-MORI is a place to give a prayer of gratitude to nature which has been providing bread of life for the Japanese from ancient times.

We define the grove closest to a life remaining near us as ‘CHINJU-NO-MORI.’
Our goal is to make best use of the grove as a place to form a bond between people as well as people and nature, and to pass down toward future our ‘wisdom’ and ‘tales’ cherished over time and also ‘heart’ and ‘space’ to show thanks to nature.
- source : chinju-no-mori.or.jp/e


under construction
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. Masaoka Shiki 正岡子規 visiting shrines and temples .

Trying to locate the various shrines and temples where Shiki wrote the following haiku.
If you know any location, please add it as a comment to this entry.
Thank you!


大村の鎮守淋しき落葉かな
Oomura no chinju sabishiki ochiba kana

the regional deities
of Omura village are lonely -
leaves are falling





牛蒡肥えて鎮守の祭近よりぬ
goboo koete chinju no matsuri chikayorinu

fertilizing burdock
the festival for the local deity
comes nearer



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Takazawa Ryooichi 高澤良一 Takazawa Ryoichi

幕僚の花見せんとて旧鎮守府

古川の秋の蜂守る総鎮守

鎮守府の官舎の樟の春落葉

鎮守府の櫻の上に海展け


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鎮守さまだけご存じの鴉の巣
chinju sama dake gozonji no karasu no su

only the local deity
knows where it is
the nest of this crow


. Takaha Shugyoo 鷹羽狩行 Takaha Shugyo .


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あたたかや上総鎮守の力石 小島健
この邑の鎮守女神に桃の花 大熊輝一
冬の陽を放さず鎮守の杜大き 長谷川かな女

坂東の里の鎮守の競べ馬 池尾テル子
寒月や火種のごとき鎮守の灯 稲田眸子
岳五つ据ゑて鎮守の秋祭 藤澤果抱
島中洲のいちじく鎮守は船の神 見市六冬
彼岸花鎮守の森の昏きより 中川宋淵
掃き寄せしまゝの榧の実鎮守さま 星野恒彦
改築の村の鎮守に匂ひ鳥 平田マサ子
村中へ鎮守の落花及びけり 土屋秀穂

苗代や鎮守の森の影を濃く 中林利作
身延九里四山鎮守す山桜 百合山羽公
鎌祀る村の鎮守や春祭 矢島渚男 延年
鵯ぐもり鎮守の森に椎をひろふ 中勘助

鎮守府の中の野道や寒烏 銀漢 吉岡禅寺洞


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